Thursday, July 15, 2010

The Millions in the World Cup 2010





For the past couple of months the journey to make 1 Million Euros in less than 5 years seemed crazy, due to certain circumstances that are changing the destiny of my life however I want to make my statement as clear as possible it is going to happen! simply by making good use of the words: action and perseverance...

This month I have been submerged into the emotions of the Wold Cup 2010 and I have to say that after seeing my own team loosing against Argentina, I had to go with my 2010 favourite team to win the world cup which is Spain and YES they did it.

However what intrigues me the most is How many Millions were made around the world cup 2010 and here are a few examples,

1)The World Cup trophy, The World Cup It’s the world’s most important sporting event. On 11th July, Spain won the 36cm, 18 carat gold World Cup trophy.

Italian sculptor Silvio Gazzaniga, who said he is not a diehard football fan himself but does watch the World Cup final to see his trophy raised, designed the current trophy in 1971. At the time, the trophy cost about US$50,000. Today, the trophy is worth over US$10 million.

“I didn’t think it would become so important, particularly to young people, or that it would come to represent peace,” Gazzaniga said. “I’m very proud to have done my little bit to help spread peace in the world through sport. Sport brings people and nations together, and is much more important than many of us believe.”

Cash4Gold, the world’s number one gold buyer direct from the public, recently said that the trophy has almost doubled in melt value since the 2006 World Cup in Germany. The rise in the price of gold has meant that the melt value of the trophy has gone from US$96,476 to an astonishing US$187,761. Melt value is the amount of actual precious metal contained in an item that can be extracted and recycled by a company such as Cash4Gold, and does not account for decorative, artistic or historic value.

“Football trophies are obviously of more than monetary worth to fans and teams,” said Jeff Aronson, CEO and founder of Cash4Gold.

Even though it is quite valuable, the trophy is also quite simple. The football, at the top of the trophy, is similar to the world, with the human figures emerging at the base supporting it.

“I didn’t want to add too many details, as it would’ve cheapened the sculpture and lessened its impact,” Gazzaniga said. “So I did the sculpture all at once, although there were things to refine later. I would modestly suggest that this intense affection for the Trophy comes from the object itself, and what it stands for. It is a symbol of victory, and they’re thrilled to have won it, which is why they kiss it as they would kiss a religious relic.”

Fifa said that the trophy is insured, but the cost of it is immeasurable because its value could far exceed the replacement cost. While the cost of a replacement for the trophy can be insured, an additional sum may offered as a reward for its safe return and the conviction of those who had taken it, in the event that it is stolen or lost, as that almost happened during the final ceremony of Spain see the video:


At the end of the World Cup, the winning team does not take the trophy home. But rather, it remains with Fifa, while the winners get a gold-plated replica to keep.

2) Diamond soccer ball, For the soccer crazy, bling loving man, Shimansky has in store the exquisite Diamond Soccer Ball! The unique diamond studded ball made from 6620 white and 2640 black round brilliant cut South African diamonds, weighing 3500 carats in totality, give this ball a total weight of 2.2kgs and a value of $2.5 million. The sparkling soccer ball took more than 3 months to create. Currently in manufacturing process (reportedly a few diamonds still need to be purchased), the ball made its world debut at the FIFA World Cup where it was unveiled by jewelry designer Yair Shimansky.

A bespoke creation, it definitely made for one of the most priceless souvenirs of this coveted tournament. What is more, crystal replicas of the ball were shown at Shimansky’s stores during the World Cup and each replica will be auctioned with proceeds going to local charities.

But now here comes the time to talk about the real soccer ball . This year's Cup will be played with the "Jabulani," a ball manufactured by one of FIFA's biggest sponsors, adidas. It's a thermal-bonded, eight-panel ball that alleges to do away with seams, forming a smaller, slightly heavier ball that its manufacturer claims will allow it to fly truer.


So what do the players and coaches think of the new ball?

Not much.

Italy's star goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon called it a "beachball." His striker teammate Giampaolo Pazzini labeled it a "disaster for strikers." Denmark manager Morten Olsen said it's "impossible." And Brazil 'keeper Julio Cesar compared it unflatteringly to supermarket stock.

Adidas, not surprisingly, has rejected these criticisms, and trotted out, ahem, some of its own endorsers to defend the product. Kaka, Frank Lampard and Michael Ballack all stood by their paychecks and sung the ball's praises.

There is serious cash on the line: adidas is selling these balls to fans for nearly $125 a pop, and they go quickly. In 2006, adidas sold a reported 10 million units of the previous World Cup ball, the "Teamgeist." This World Cup, both adidas and bitter rivals Nike expect to combine for nearly $4 billion in sales of associated merchandise. With all that money, there's a bit of guerilla warfare going on.

Prior to every competition, players complain about the ball. Usually, they are players from rival endorsement companies, and almost all of them are goalkeepers. This year, to be fair, the criticism is coming from field players and coaches as well. (On that: considering adidas outfits the Danish national team, it's almost certain that Olsen is getting a strong lecture tonight.) That doesn't mean the criticism is fair or accurate. What it means is that sportsmen, a superstitious lot, don't like change.

Ok the ball as we all saw, was so weak that after a 70km kick it had no real destination it could go anywhere and that was bad for the sport exept for the goal of Netherlands 35 year old captain Gio van Bronckhorst see video:


One thing is for sure about the new World Cup ball. It was kicked into play on June 11th. Goals were scored, and keepers made saves. A couple of players made excuses, and those excuses will be ignored. In other words, life will go on just as it does at every World Cup.And, in 2014, adidas will roll out a new ball.

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